Four cylinder transaxle cars
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By SeaCay
#69962
There are quite a few threads at the other place regarding hatch/frame separation. The consensus seems to be that the usual methods just don't seem to work, with re-delamination of the hatch glass from the frame occurring too soon and too often.

So, does anyone have any insight/knowledge about any of these products from Henkel (Loctite company):

https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/my/en/ ... e=Products

I believe a huge problem would be that if/when it failed, you'd have to throw the hatch and frame away if using one of the urethane adhesives. But if the project fails to begin with (using older technology) are you really not in the same boat anyway?

So, who has any inside info/experience with the above? ORRRRR, have you successfully resealed a hatch with another method?
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By BeerBurner
#70052
I tried sealing my hatch with no success (although I didn't do the proper "remove everything and start from scratch" approach). About 10 years ago, I got tired of the leaks and bought a strip of black, adhesive vinyl, popped the trim off the top, and just ran it across the top of the glass, wrapping it around the top of the frame, and put it all back together. It's starting to look a little rough if you pay attention to it but it's still working. At a casual glance, it looks like it's supposed to be there.
IMG_20210330_124253870_HDR.jpg
So, no, I didn't really "fix" it but it's good enough to make the leaks go away.

BB.
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By sh944
#125320
I should really dig out one of my old articles from the other place for doing this. I was indeed successful and made a small cottage industry in the KC area doing this for friends and fellow 944/68 owners for a while back in 2003-06. I only know of one of the hatches that I resealed that failed. It can be done, it’s a PITA and I used 3-m window weld products but you have to use all of the products, including the cleaners and primers AND follow the 3-m instruction to the letter.
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By SeaCay
#146719
sh944 wrote: Thu Dec 30, 2021 9:31 pm I should really dig out one of my old articles from the other place for doing this. I was indeed successful and made a small cottage industry in the KC area doing this for friends and fellow 944/68 owners for a while back in 2003-06. I only know of one of the hatches that I resealed that failed. It can be done, it’s a PITA and I used 3-m window weld products but you have to use all of the products, including the cleaners and primers AND follow the 3-m instruction to the letter.
Image

Seriously, gimme the knowledge, doooood :typing:
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By sh944
#149813
Sorry, send me a pm and let’s arrange a time to talk on the phone. It will be faster that way.
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By sh944
#149882
Mining my previous comments from the other site...


The 3-M Window Weld works very well when used as designed. There are a couple of main things that trip people up on these hatches:

1) (as mentioned before) if silicon has previously been used to try and seal the window, you might as well throw the glass away, it won't hold no matter what you do. I have yet to find a cleaner or prep solution that works to make a silicon'd glass adhere to the hatch
2) In addition to the 3-M Window Weld adhesive, there are actually two different 3-M primers required. One is for the glass, the other is needed to prep the hatch frame (both made by 3-M and referenced in the product instruction sheets). This is the real key to making the repair last, it makes a huge difference.
3) I'd strongly suggest remounting the hatch frame on the car before applying the adhesive, as that will make sure its properly aligned with the body once the glass is back in place. Its possible to get the glass misaligned on the frame so that it doesn't fit quite right when doing it with the frame off the car, and this will cause both short term and long term problems.
4) A power caulk gun is *really* nice to have when applying the adhesive unless you have GI Joe Kung Fu grip. Assuming you don't have a power gun (most folks don't and I wouldn't buy one just for this project), get a second tube of adhesive and a second typical hardware store caulk gun with a buddy to help you. Both start at the middle top of the frame and each person works down their side of the car and try to meet in the middle of the bottom of the frame. Use plenty of adhesive, you do not want to go sparingly.
5) Once you have the glass back on the car and positioned, a couple of pieces of blue masking tape (two on each side) taping it down to the body will do the trick, leave it 24 hours and it will be cured plenty well.
6) I suggest a strip of black paint on the outside of the glass at the top edge where the adhesive is visible through the glass as that helps protect it from UV.

I've done this procedure a number of times for various hatches, and the one on the Sherman (the 951 that I sold to Ben) was done back in 2003 and is still holding strong. I know of at least two other hatches that I did around the same time that are still holding as well.
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