General discussions related to cars and driving
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By David993S
#25328
Since it seemed to be an annual topic on the other site, here's what I do to winterize my cars for approximately 6 months of storage:

- Wash and thoroughly dry the car (so I don't have to do it in the Spring)
- Oil/filter change immediately prior to storage (you don't want to leave "used" oil in during extended storage - used oil can be somewhat acidic )
- add a bottle of Stabil and fill the gas tank (a full tank avoids condensation forming in the tank)
-pump tires up to 50 psi and let the car sit on a piece of carpet remnant or tire cradles (don't put the car on jack stands unless you place the stands under the suspension. stands under the frame can potentially cause issues - the suspension is designed to hold the weight of the car).
- connect a battery tender/maintainer (do not use a trickle charger - they will overcharge and fry your battery over long periods of time)
- use your favorite rodent-deterrent method, if necessary.
-cover the car (optional)
- Lastly, do not periodically start the car unless you can let it run up to full operating temperature. Starting it and running it for short periods only creates condensation in the engine and exhaust system.

I've been doing these simple steps for many years and they always start right up in the Spring with no issues.

Cheers.
User avatar
By amdavid
#25331
One of the few advantages of living in CA, even in the north (of CA)............no winterizing necessary. I will say spring is probably a bit more special there. Thanks for sharing, good info.
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By NCporsche
#25352
I skip some of the OPs steps but always inflate tires to 50psi. Running Pirelli P6000.

Thanks for reminder, need to get car cover cleaned.
User avatar
By NCporsche
#25361
JimV8 wrote: Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:43 pm Brakes calipers should be cleaned and sliders lubed too.
Why not wait until Spring and flush the brake fluid at the same time?
User avatar
By JimV8
#25414
NCporsche wrote: Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:50 pm
JimV8 wrote: Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:43 pm Brakes calipers should be cleaned and sliders lubed too.
Why not wait until Spring and flush the brake fluid at the same time?
Better I think to put it away up clean, and removes the urge come Spring to go for that first drive before doing those essentials.
User avatar
By worf
#25457
My winterizing procedure:
- fill with gas and fuel stabilizer
- wash
- exterior detail as required: clay, polish, wax depending upon factors
- interior detail. Every other year seats get removed for thorough cleaning, conditioning. Makes it easier to vacuum too.
- on stands
- oil / filter change
- wheels removed, cleaned inside and out, waxed
- brake calipers cleaned on all sides and treated with a coat of CorrosionX
- brake fluid flush
- any other scheduled maintenance (i.e. plugs, belts, etc.)
- wheels back on, air up to 44 PSI or sidewall max inflation whichever is less.
- battery tender
- car cover

And then they sit until Spring.
User avatar
By AKSteve
#25533
I'm going to parking my 991 turbo cabriolet over winter for the first time year instead of putting snow tires on and driving it year round. I change the oil in my 911's every spring. So is it really any worse to let the car sit until the spring compared to driving it with the same oil until the spring?
User avatar
By worf
#26881
AKSteve wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:58 am So is it really any worse to let the car sit until the spring compared to driving it with the same oil until the spring?
I do it in the fall so that on the first day after salt/brine is washed from the roads I can *drive* instead of having to change my oil.
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