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By fpena944
#87903
Ran across this video and noticed a rod lying on the road after this guy was drifting.

Now what caused this to happen? Didn't seem like the engine was over-revving. Did he shift when he shouldn't have? Little puzzled, what do you all think? (not that I would do this anyway but curious as I thought maybe some tires and possibly a clutch would be sacrificed but never an engine!)

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By worf
#87904
IIRC the E92 M3 is “known” to have soft rod bearings.

The guys at RSR Nurburg explained this to me as the reason they retired their E92s from ‘ring duty at 80k-ish km and retained a couple for “tour” duty only.

Otherwise, don’t know: video wouldn’t load for me :(

One I took on a tour:

Image
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By fpena944
#87906
worf wrote: Sun Jun 27, 2021 2:28 pm IIRC the E92 M3 is “known” to have soft rod bearings.

The guys at RSR Nurburg explained this to me as the reason they retired their E92s from ‘ring duty at 80k-ish km and retained a couple for “tour” duty only.

Otherwise, don’t know: video wouldn’t load for me :(

One I took on a tour:

Image
It's a Facebook video and doesn't require logging in so surprised you couldn't see it.

I guess that would explain it since doing donuts in a parking lot probably causes some stress on the engine.

Good looking car, just had a douche owner who blew it up!
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By AKSteve
#88940
It would be a fun comparison to take a brand new 911 and a brand new M3 and bounce them both off of the rev limiter until the engines explode. I'm going to assume the 911 would last longer, but who knows.
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By 911Königin
#105159
There are LOTS of them on the track!
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By linderpat
#105229
AKSteve wrote: Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:34 am It would be a fun comparison to take a brand new 911 and a brand new M3 and bounce them both off of the rev limiter until the engines explode. I'm going to assume the 911 would last longer, but who knows.
Not if you read the 997 forum on rennlist. Our 997's are so fragile that merely taking them out in the rain can be perilous to the car. People ask questions about whether they can be tracked in a DE, and worry about destroying the car if they do so (novice level too, I might add). We are told to never let them idle, but upon starting, jump in and quickly drive off like a LeMans racer in the 70's (hence, the reason for the key on the left side of the steering column). We are told that if we don't, the bores will score and the engine will become toast. And oh, by the way, don't let the revs exceed 3K until everything is up to temp and hot, which takes at least 20 minutes (longer than the typical commute).

so, if some are to be believed, the 911 doesn't stand a chance. I am not of that camp, BTW. :thumbup:
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By fpena944
#105260
linderpat wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 10:05 am
AKSteve wrote: Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:34 am It would be a fun comparison to take a brand new 911 and a brand new M3 and bounce them both off of the rev limiter until the engines explode. I'm going to assume the 911 would last longer, but who knows.
Not if you read the 997 forum on rennlist. Our 997's are so fragile that merely taking them out in the rain can be perilous to the car. People ask questions about whether they can be tracked in a DE, and worry about destroying the car if they do so (novice level too, I might add). We are told to never let them idle, but upon starting, jump in and quickly drive off like a LeMans racer in the 70's (hence, the reason for the key on the left side of the steering column). We are told that if we don't, the bores will score and the engine will become toast. And oh, by the way, don't let the revs exceed 3K until everything is up to temp and hot, which takes at least 20 minutes (longer than the typical commute).

so, if some are to be believed, the 911 doesn't stand a chance. I am not of that camp, BTW. :thumbup:
Try the 996 board too, some believe if you look at an M96 with a frown it'll get angry and blow up on you!
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By Airkuhl
#105262
linderpat wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 10:05 am
AKSteve wrote: Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:34 am It would be a fun comparison to take a brand new 911 and a brand new M3 and bounce them both off of the rev limiter until the engines explode. I'm going to assume the 911 would last longer, but who knows.
Not if you read the 997 forum on rennlist. Our 997's are so fragile that merely taking them out in the rain can be perilous to the car. People ask questions about whether they can be tracked in a DE, and worry about destroying the car if they do so (novice level too, I might add). We are told to never let them idle, but upon starting, jump in and quickly drive off like a LeMans racer in the 70's (hence, the reason for the key on the left side of the steering column). We are told that if we don't, the bores will score and the engine will become toast. And oh, by the way, don't let the revs exceed 3K until everything is up to temp and hot, which takes at least 20 minutes (longer than the typical commute).

so, if some are to be believed, the 911 doesn't stand a chance. I am not of that camp, BTW. :thumbup:

So true, lol. I bought a used manual 997S with a few dreaded and deadly "over-revs" stored in the computer. The seller practically gave it away because the RL and 6-speed hive-minds declared it worthless because it hit 7.4K a couple of times for 3 milliseconds with a 7.3K redline.
I drove that car hard, including track days at Laguna Seca where I used the throttle like a toggle switch and happily shifted at redline for hours per day. That car was 100% reliable for many years and I bet it's still going strong.

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