Boats, Planes, Motorcycles, ATVs, RVs, and all other fun non-automotive vehicles
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By JimV8
#3497
The appeal of motor power 2 wheeled Is I think not much different that that of 4 wheel cages except it’s more involving. The reason I wrote senior is because it applies to Moi. Ontario for the most part is unsafe for motorcycling and even the good places have their moments. But I’ve learned Mexico is made for 2 wheel adventuring and motorcycling is the most widely used method of transportation. The most I’ve seen on a bike was five, momma and four kids obviously off to a birthday party because of the balloons. I’ve seen two guys on a bike with the passenger holding the extension ladder. So riding here is pretty well the same as anywhere, gotta have the M endorsement and Proof of Insurance. Since I don’t have the M that’s the start. In Ontario there 3Ms. The first we get by completing and passing the written course and Passing an eye exam, the 2nd M is achieved after 14-18 months experience on passing a course riding test and the final M is (I think) after passing a road test within two years of getting the M2.

So there’s quite a time gap between M3 and M, and that can be reduced by about 1/2 if completing an accredited riding course. Which At the moment is my plan. The ultimate Mexico motorcycle is a tourer capable of tarmac, gravel and dirt roads. That because even though it may start as paved there’s 50/50 odds there’s going to be dirt involved. At the moment it looks like the Suzuki 650 VStrom Is a strong candidate, with a Honda Varadero as runner up.

I’m looking ahead by 9 months to opportunistically acquiring a beginner bike, I’ve learned it should be light, tossable and not overly powerful. And just because it’s me it should be cheap in case I manage to wreck it. So I have an offer in on a Honda Vf500F Interceptor that’s been parked for a couple of years ( according to the owner drained of fuel). The 500 is recognized as one if not the best handling bike of the eighties. It has an exceptional 6 speed box and a V4 putting out 70hp. It’s a different animal than the 750 V4 which had its demons.
My biggest problem in all this will be allaying the fear in my daughter that I won’t be killed on the bike. My brother died 4 years ago when an out of control car crossed the centre line and hit him head on.
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By lupo.sk
#3616
Get a cheap 125-200 4stroke as a beginner’s bike. Start riding offroad
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By JimV8
#3625
Thanks, I ride mountain bike off road and enjoy the quiet. No attraction to dirt moto riding and the potential for injury is too high. I looked at the small displacement bikes and think I’ll soon tire of that. The attraction of small engine bikes is the weight and even then none are light, and the Honda 500 comes in a hair over 400 lb dry so that’s pretty light. Physically, I have to fit as well and even then my long legs are going to be a challenge on the 500.
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By lupo.sk
#3703
JimV8 wrote: Tue Aug 04, 2020 3:51 pm Thanks, I ride mountain bike off road and enjoy the quiet. No attraction to dirt moto riding and the potential for injury is too high. I looked at the small displacement bikes and think I’ll soon tire of that. The attraction of small engine bikes is the weight and even then none are light, and the Honda 500 comes in a hair over 400 lb dry so that’s pretty light. Physically, I have to fit as well and even then my long legs are going to be a challenge on the 500.
I meant dirt roads, not closed courses and jumps.
Just like amdavid posted. The TW is a sweeeet ride
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By lupo.sk
#3721
www.duckduckgo.com

Yamaha TW200 / TW125
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By JimV8
#3734
Thanks, a quick check shows those are rare in Canada, but I expect dual sports generally fit the bill. But why would a dual sport be the choice for a beginner bike when my selection of road surfaces is 90/10 asphalt ? My previous long term riding was many decades ago and I’ve ridden friends road bikes for an hour here and there and I don’t have any seat time on a dual sport so just wondering. Here’s what I’d mostly be riding on.
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By lupo.sk
#3873
I thought you want to ride in MX where it’s 50/50 tarmac / gravel...
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By Paddlefoot64
#3969
I have 3 bikes, BMW R100 Cafe (custom), 2012 Triumph Thruxton, and 2018 Ducati SSS. The Thruxton is probably friendliest, the Ducati the safest (has ABS and TC). I would get the bike running and go practice. Large parking lots are good for practicing low speed maneuvers and panic stops. Absent ABS, the rear, if locked, will let you slide right through an intersection panic stop. Ask me how I know?
Motorcycling will never be as safe as driving, but you can make safer by practicing and being observant, IMHO.
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By JimV8
#3978
Riding in Mexico is the ultimate plan but first I need to go through the licensing in Canada and that’ll involve 2 summers. Once I get the M endorsement then I’m good to ride down here. I can ride down here now, and that wouldn’t be much different from many Mexicans who don’t have insurance, let alone a license. But as a foreigner the risk of getting caught is confiscation of the Bike, jail and a big fine. I went to the local Yamaha store here to check out the floor models. I looked at the bikes too. I was pleasantly surprised at the low cost compared to Canadian prices. List on a 125 new was 37,000$ pesos which at today’s conversion is $2200 C. I wouldn’t get a 125 though as those are prime theft bikes, or subject to jacking at impromptu Cartel tolls. I’m told those bikes go to the spotters who position in the hills above the highways and they want light bikes. I joined Mexico Motorcycle an online group who coordinate rides and post interesting rides. One such is Copper Canyon, in the mountains, that’s a 2 day ride from here. It’s also way up near the clouds too, which is why I want a fuel injected bike in Mexico.
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By amdavid
#3987
200 cc might be your ticket. The Tdub is a sweet little tweener. You can throw some dual sport tires on for the roads pictured.
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By JimV8
#4006
Thanks, I did find some TW200s on FB Marketplace near my place in Ontario and they must be special bikes based on how they keep their value. I also watch a few YouTube vids of TW200s and realized that bike won’t work for me due to a max speed of 65. I’ll get run over by trucks. Highway travel is unavoidable for me if I want to venture more than 1/2 hour from home. Also I need my bike to do the license road test and that specifies a highway capable Bike. I’ll wait and see if the guy bites at my $400 offer on the interceptor.

Here’s another interesting route through the hills There’s an ancient people’s, tribe high in the mountains who are known as the Barefoot Walkers. They’re acclimated to high altitude and walk run long distances daily, because that’s how they get around. A friend said she saw them and described the soles of their feet as from another planet.
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By lupo.sk
#4155
I never said you should ride a little 125-250 enduro on a freeway. You asked about a good light beginner bike and given your goal of riding in MX on 50/50 dirt/tarmac, I suggested a light enduro and start riding offroad (dirt roads, forrest / fire / service paths..) so you get a feel for the bile and how to handle yourself. Explore the countryside around your house and enjoy riding. If you fall or hurt yourself, it will be only your fault and you’re not gonna end up like your brother.
Once you master that, you can safely move to tarmac and bigger displacements.

I only ride motorbikes since about I was about 7 years old so what do I know. Bought my first bike at 12 and been riding ever since (dirtbikes, supermotards) with about a 4 year gap for cancer treatment and hip joint implants. Now only have a 125 enduro due to said hip joint implants.
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By Porschemaven
#4176
Are two strokes banned in Mexico? If not they are much lighter than 4 strokes. My 250CC enduro weighs 245 lbs.
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By JimV8
#4179
lupo.sk wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 5:50 pm I never said you should ride a little 125-250 enduro on a freeway. You asked about a good light beginner bike and given your goal of riding in MX on 50/50 dirt/tarmac, I suggested a light enduro and start riding offroad (dirt roads, forrest / fire / service paths..) so you get a feel for the bile and how to handle yourself. Explore the countryside around your house and enjoy riding. If you fall or hurt yourself, it will be only your fault and you’re not gonna end up like your brother.
Once you master that, you can safely move to tarmac and bigger displacements.

I only ride motorbikes since about I was about 7 years old so what do I know. Bought my first bike at 12 and been riding ever since (dirtbikes, supermotards) with about a 4 year gap for cancer treatment and hip joint implants. Now only have a 125 enduro due to said hip joint implants.
Thanks for your advice. A really major constraint for me is time. This CV19 pause aside I split my time 6 months Mex/Can and I want to get to riding in Mex ASAP which is now 2 years off due to the licensing protocols. My take on the matter mirrors the advice in the licensing system and from instructors on line advice which is to acquire skill and muscle memory. So that’s getting in as many practice hours as possible on the roads and parking lots. FWIW my brother didn’t have a chance based on the police report. He was riding on a quiet two lane paved road and an elderly man who wasn’t properly medically supervised had an event and veered hard left into my brothers lane and bike and drove his car into the ditch. Now my brothers skills may have been off as it was his first ride of the season, but he had taken the initial riding course as well as an advanced course so I doubt there was much he could do about it. The outcome is the old guys license was lifted as was his physicians license to practice and his insurance company is on the hook for a major settlement, but my brother is still dead. I figure the odds of me biting the dust due to biking is pretty low, as I’m pretty sure I won’t be accused of hooligan riding and I have a very good driving record as well and my brother took the odds on a weird accident. But I have to reassure my daughter and that’s the major challenge in all of this.
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By JimV8
#4184
Porschemaven wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 6:31 pm Are two strokes banned in Mexico? If not they are much lighter than 4 strokes. My 250CC enduro weighs 245 lbs.
From what I’ve seen on the roads here nothing is banned. The distances are big though so a comfortable seat will matter and then there’s the 2 up riding that is a distinct possibility which is why I said the Honda Varadero is on my list. It’s BMW1200 heavy, very reliable and a very comfortable tourer. It’s a big bike last imported into Canada in 2010, has ABS and Honda’s linked braking and a 1000 twin, the other bike is a VStrom 650 2015 and newer. But neither of those are beginner bikes.
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By Johnny Five
#4196
I learned on an S1000RR. Anything light (sub-450lbs) with adequate power and an upright seating position (standard bike, dirt bike, to a lesser extent crotch rocket) is a good start. I found the laid back riding style of a Harley or cruiser very disconcerting as I was learning.

A dirt bike or road legal enduro is probably perfect to learn on but with bigger dirt bikes there’s a steep learning curve with the clutch and low end torque.

Some kind of 350-500 ninja or standard (upright) seating position light sport bike would probably be perfect. Or if they make it a 350 enduro would be even better.
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By JimV8
#4238
Johnny Five wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:29 pm I learned on an S1000RR. Anything light (sub-450lbs) with adequate power and an upright seating position (standard bike, dirt bike, to a lesser extent crotch rocket) is a good start. I found the laid back riding style of a Harley or cruiser very disconcerting as I was learning.

A dirt bike or road legal enduro is probably perfect to learn on but with bigger dirt bikes there’s a steep learning curve with the clutch and low end torque.

Some kind of 350-500 ninja or standard (upright) seating position light sport bike would probably be perfect. Or if they make it a 350 enduro would be even better.

Whoa,, 190+ HP beginner bike. So do tell.
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By Johnny Five
#4239
I typed a long reply but it got deleted.

Gist: Dirtbikes are excellent to learn on, very fun, great for adventure and street but a very rough unrefined ride compared to street bike. Like comparing a lifted bumpy loud jeep to a sports car. Mostly due to 1 cylinder engine character of dirt bikes.

I ride a couple of 200MPH rockets and a supermoto - big dirt bike with street bike wheels sticky tires big brakes slipper clutch - instant ticket to jail and the funnest ride on 2 wheels.
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By Johnny Five
#4243
Life changing speed. Better than sex? No, as good, different. Revs to 14,200 sounds like an F1 car 100MPH happens in 1st gear. The next five are clicked off at full throttle with no clutch. The biggest power comes at redline - as you accelerate you do so at an increasing rate. Very closely spaced gear ratio means you bump the quick shift under full throttle, the tach drops to 11000 and you’re right back in the power band ripping off gears QUICK. 3rd gear feels like 2nd gear and 4th gear feels like 3rd gear. 100-160 is nearly as fast as you can rip 20-80. It tries to pull you off the back and it’s fucking nuts.

I modded it into a dedicated track bike over the years - all carbon panels all titanium hardware, titanium subframes, inconel exhaust, etc.

400 lbs 190WHP similar power to weight as F1. You need one. 🤠


JimV8 wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 9:19 pm
Johnny Five wrote: Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:29 pm I learned on an S1000RR. Anything light (sub-450lbs) with adequate power and an upright seating position (standard bike, dirt bike, to a lesser extent crotch rocket) is a good start. I found the laid back riding style of a Harley or cruiser very disconcerting as I was learning.

A dirt bike or road legal enduro is probably perfect to learn on but with bigger dirt bikes there’s a steep learning curve with the clutch and low end torque.

Some kind of 350-500 ninja or standard (upright) seating position light sport bike would probably be perfect. Or if they make it a 350 enduro would be even better.

Whoa,, 190+ HP beginner bike. So do tell.
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By Johnny Five
#4247
Also it’s dangerous as fuck riding on the street these days - always has been is way worse now with cell phones more traffic shitty new drivers. You say you’ll be riding in Mexico? It may be much better there since drivers are more motorcycle aware. In the US you must ride like they don’t see you - because they don’t.

I very rarely ride on the streets these days but I love to rip it open at the track. I would argue an ultra high speed track day, riding at 70-80% of your limit is safer than a ride across town. Sorry to be a downer it’s just the facts. Respect to all those who do though!
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By groovzilla
#4333
I'm a BMW Airhead guy.
Don't ride much anymore do to helmet law but on occasion will take out wither my 1966 R60/2, my 1978 R100RS or my 1995 R100RT for a spin around my house or to a bar for a drink or 2.
Love these bikes - They have a wonderful feel with the opposing cylinders. Not speed bikes just nice cruising bike to roll around town and do some driving in the mountain road
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By JimV8
#4393
Nice bikes those Boxers are. I read about the torque effect which causes the bike to lean when throttle is applied and is most noticeable from first moving out. Early on in my quest a guy wanted to trade his 04 r1150r for my Quad 800 outlander. He wanted to go bush riding with his friends. That was before all the COVID and my decision to shelter in place. Who knows, otherwise I might have gone ahead with it.
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By Asquared
#4407
JimV8 wrote: Tue Aug 04, 2020 11:16 am I’m looking ahead by 9 months to opportunistically acquiring a beginner bike, I’ve learned it should be light, tossable and not overly powerful. And just because it’s me it should be cheap in case I manage to wreck it. So I have an offer in on a Honda Vf500F Interceptor that’s been parked for a couple of years ( according to the owner drained of fuel). The 500 is recognized as one if not the best handling bike of the eighties. It has an exceptional 6 speed box and a V4 putting out 70hp. It’s a different animal than the 750 V4 which had its demons.
FWIW, when I was in the army, I had a VF700F. Was a great bike, but one mechanic told me that every VF500F he had seen had been laid down. He said it was such a great handling bike that people didn't know where the limits were and inevitably dropped it. Probably more to do with the kids that bought them, but thought I would point it out.

Now that I'm moving to TN, I hope to ride my sportster more, and I would love to get a sport bike, but I have to prove to my wife that I will ride it enough to make it worthwhile (since I rarely ride the HD because riding in the street grid around here isn't that much fun - but I suspect that riding in the smokey mountains will be blast.
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By JimV8
#4533
Asquared wrote: Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:25 am
JimV8 wrote: Tue Aug 04, 2020 11:16 am I’m looking ahead by 9 months to opportunistically acquiring a beginner bike, I’ve learned it should be light, tossable and not overly powerful. And just because it’s me it should be cheap in case I manage to wreck it. So I have an offer in on a Honda Vf500F Interceptor that’s been parked for a couple of years ( according to the owner drained of fuel). The 500 is recognized as one if not the best handling bike of the eighties. It has an exceptional 6 speed box and a V4 putting out 70hp. It’s a different animal than the 750 V4 which had its demons.
FWIW, when I was in the army, I had a VF700F. Was a great bike, but one mechanic told me that every VF500F he had seen had been laid down. He said it was such a great handling bike that people didn't know where the limits were and inevitably dropped it. Probably more to do with the kids that bought them, but thought I would point it out.

Now that I'm moving to TN, I hope to ride my sportster more, and I would love to get a sport bike, but I have to prove to my wife that I will ride it enough to make it worthwhile (since I rarely ride the HD because riding in the street grid around here isn't that much fun - but I suspect that riding in the smokey mountains will be blast.
Thanks for that. The 500 has a 56” wheelbase so it’s not a small bike. What’s interesting is it has a 16” front wheel and an 18” rear so that’s going to affect how it goes through a corner. And even though it’s now a vintage bike the engine will push O-60 in less than 4 seconds. Me like that. Hopefully some maturity comes with age and I won’t be trying to see how low I can make it go. The riding position is near upright and it has a 30.5 seat height so that’s pretty good. The guy selling the bike is close to nowhereontario so he’s not going to see a lot of buyers especially now in light of the economic situation. As luck would have it my nephew who lives in nowhereontario is an hour drive from the bike and he’s offered to get it for me if and when. I’m already looking forward to doing what has to be done to get it on the road.
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By groovzilla
#4560
Paddlefoot64 wrote: Thu Aug 06, 2020 11:03 am I also have a Beemer. One of the few mono-shock Airheads around. Love the Aprilia kitchen appliance in above Post!
Yeah your beemer is cafe'd out - Looks like a fun ride!
My 1995 R100RT is also Monoshock. Better handling and overall nicer suspension setup and the Monoshock bikes are highly desirable.
Be safe!


8-)
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By Paddlefoot64
#5679
Yeah your beemer is cafe'd out - Looks like a fun ride!
My 1995 R100RT is also Monoshock. Better handling and overall nicer suspension setup and the Monoshock bikes are highly desirable.
Be safe!

Thanks Gruvzilla!


8-)
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By Fox_
#5863
I know fuck all about motor scooters.

For myself,

I want this one:
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Would probably actually get this one:

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Still on the radar, but ya know, circumstances.
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By Torch
#9320
I've lived for anything with 2 wheels and an engine since I was a kid but the last few years it seems like going out for a ride is like going to job I don't like. Sharing the road with idiots just makes it miserable. It honestly didn't seem this way 20 years ago. Also most of my friends have given up riding.
I live in an area of small rural towns in northern Indiana (1 hour SE of Chicago), and now mainly do road trips to southern Indiana and parts of Kentucky which seem far more laid back and less dangerous.

My Busa is my daily ride. I'm nearing 30K miles. It can definitely outrun a Motorola. :evil:

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CX500 Turbo. My ultimate dream bike since I read about it in my dad's Popular Science when I was 11 years old. I've owned this for 18 years now. Stupid dangerous...there's lag and then 19.3 psi of boost hits hard. I'll never grow tired of riding this bike or looking at it.

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CX650 Turbo. The new and improved version of the 500T. Much lighter and no lag, just pure linear power to the point you wouldn't know it has a turbo (16.7 psi). In a roll-on, it's ungodly fast...it won't beat the Hayabusa, but it won't be left behind in the dust either, impressive for a pushrod V-twin made in 1983. I've owned it for 17 years and I'll probably be selling soon...it's never really clicked with me. Interestingly, it shares next to no parts with the 500T.

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By 911Königin
#11908
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By Johnny Five
#11930
Awesome bikes! 30k on the Busa is epic. I used to live for street riding now I don’t do it at all or very rarely. Track days are still a good option...
Torch wrote: Wed Aug 19, 2020 7:43 pm I've lived for anything with 2 wheels and an engine since I was a kid but the last few years it seems like going out for a ride is like going to job I don't like. Sharing the road with idiots just makes it miserable. It honestly didn't seem this way 20 years ago. Also most of my friends have given up riding.
I live in an area of small rural towns in northern Indiana (1 hour SE of Chicago), and now mainly do road trips to southern Indiana and parts of Kentucky which seem far more laid back and less dangerous.

My Busa is my daily ride. I'm nearing 30K miles. It can definitely outrun a Motorola. :evil:

Image

CX500 Turbo. My ultimate dream bike since I read about it in my dad's Popular Science when I was 11 years old. I've owned this for 18 years now. Stupid dangerous...there's lag and then 19.3 psi of boost hits hard. I'll never grow tired of riding this bike or looking at it.

Image

CX650 Turbo. The new and improved version of the 500T. Much lighter and no lag, just pure linear power to the point you wouldn't know it has a turbo (16.7 psi). In a roll-on, it's ungodly fast...it won't beat the Hayabusa, but it won't be left behind in the dust either, impressive for a pushrod V-twin made in 1983. I've owned it for 17 years and I'll probably be selling soon...it's never really clicked with me. Interestingly, it shares next to no parts with the 500T.

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By jcnesq
#13451
I went reentry at 65 after 50 years of not riding. I got a big ass Harley, which is probably not the best leap to take, as it is a handful, OTOH I figured I could learn.

For learning, I would highly recommend ridelikeapro.com. The video course is very helpful, I have watched multiple times. They have other very helpful stuff too, all very reasonably priced. Although geared toward heavier bikes, the same stuff applies to any bike and its all invaluable to know stuff.

My training bike.
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